Develop a literature map or a visual representation of the Nursing Assignment Help

Develop a literature map or a visual representation of the Public Health Informatics literature. 

Also include a powerpoint presentation explaining the literature map with the slides

Constructing a literature map helps you:

  • develop an understanding of the key issues and research findings in the literature
  • organize ideas
  • see how different research studies relate to one another
  • group similar findings
  • identify gaps in the literature

It’s important to represent different views and aspects of the research. There is a danger in only including literature that supports your own beliefs or findings. The purpose of these assignments is not to test your accuracy of the literature, but to practice the skills for finding, selecting, and synthesizing research. Your brainstorming map and final literature map will not be exactly the same, and that’s okay. I want to see the progression of your understanding of key themes and ideas in the research.

Idea mapping is a type of brainstorming. It can help you think of new topics or ideas and build upon what you know. A concept map is a visual representation of your topic or issue, and how it is linked to other themes and ideas. You can use concept maps to organize the information you already know or have, and then areas you want to further explore. Concept maps are also sometimes referred to as idea maps or spider diagrams.

Concept Map

Concept maps can take several shapes, and use different colors, lines, and images to organize ideas. Elements are arranged intuitively according to the importance of the concepts and organized into groups or branches. These maps can help you to identify hierarchies or expand to higher levels of thinking. They help you see connections between themes or ideas and provide an overview of key points. Concept maps can also be used to unpack ideas and maximize active learning. One advantage of concept maps is that they help you to see the big picture and help you chunk information together based on meaningful connections.

Creating a Map

Concept maps can be done with pen and paper or digitally. There are different software programs available for laptops and tablets like Miro Board, but it can also be done through Microsoft Word. But no matter what tool you use, all mind maps should begin with a central idea. Your central idea starts with the topic you are going explore in the context of public health informatics. If you want to color code your map, make your central topic a distinct color so it will always stand out on your page. From your central topic, begin to add branches. This is where the brainstorming begins. The main branches flow from your central topic as key themes, then you can expand on each of those themes with additional branches.

Each branch you add will need to have its own key idea or concept linking it to the central topic. You want these to be brief to continue generating associations. This can also help you chunk ideas into concepts and themes that you can color code. Color coding links the visual and logical concepts in a mind map and generates mental shortcuts. It can also allow you identify connections you may not have immediately thought of. Adding color also makes it more appealing and engaging for yourself and any audience you share it with. Images can be impactful in creating mental shortcuts and associations, as well as convey information more effectively than words or phrases. The mind processes images instantly and act as visual stimuli to recall information. Consider using icons such as those from The Noun Project https://thenounproject.com/ to add visual signifiers to your mind map.

Using the map that you built in step one, you will begin to use research and evidence to justify the connections you made. Look at the ideas and connections that you made in the brainstorming map and find literature that supports your connection. You will build a search strategy for your different concepts using keywords, subject headings, and Boolean operators. Once you have your search results you will evaluate your sources, and refine your search as needed. Part of this assignment will be to practice these research skills and keep track of your search strategies.

If you can’t find anything to support it, that’s okay. There will be a chance to update your map and reflect on the process later on.

Building a Search Strategy

There are several steps involved in building a search strategy. Each has an important place in the research process. Identify key concepts: The first step is to identify the key concepts from your brainstorming map. Do this by selecting nouns important to the meaning of your topic or question and leave out words that don’t help the search such as adjectives and verbs

  1. Develop search terms: Once you have identified your key concepts, the next step is to create your search terms. Based on your key concepts brainstorm synonyms, related terms, and alternate forms of each the concepts. Also consider associations with other words and concepts.
  2. Select databases: Subject specific databases are the most effective way to search for peer reviewed articles. Databases can help you find a broad range of research, including background evidence and foreground information. Most
  3. Introduce Boolean operators: Boolean operators let you combine search terms in specific ways to broaden or narrow your search.
  4. Perform searches: With your search terms and Boolean operators, you can begin to create your search statement.
  5. Filter search results: Using search filters can help you improve your search results.
  6. Refine search strategy: Searching is an iterative process. You’re not going to get all possible results on your first try.

Creating a search strategy is only half the battle. Once you find an article you need to consider the type of source and evaluate it against your information needs. To do this, scan the abstract and body of the article while asking yourself some of the key questions below in the DRAMA framework. If the article is relevant to your research process, then read it to pull out the information you need to support your argument. You can then use citation tracing strategies to find related information.

Types of sources

Information needs are why you need sources. And it’s important that you find the right sources to fit your different information needs.

Information needs include:

  • To learn more background information.
  • To answer your research question(s).
  • To convince your audience that your answer is correct or, at least, the most reasonable answer.
  • To describe the situation surrounding your research question for your audience and explain why it’s important.
  • To report what others have said about your question, including any different answers to your research question.

Evaluating Sources

Source evaluation is the process of critically appraising information in relation to a given purpose to determine if it’s appropriate for the intended use

Citation tracing

Scholarship is a conversation. Citations form the basis of the scholarly communication and help to carry the conversation forward.  

Searching

Building a Search Strategy

Using the map that you built in step one, you will begin to use research and evidence to justify the connections you made. Look at the ideas and connections that you made in the brainstorming map and find literature that supports your connection. You will build a search strategy for your different concepts using keywords, subject headings, and Boolean operators. Once you have your search results you will evaluate your sources, and refine your search as needed. Part of this assignment will be to practice these research skills and keep track of your search strategies.

If you can’t find anything to support it, that’s okay. There will be a chance to update your map and reflect on the process later.

Building a Search Strategy

There are several steps involved in building a search strategy. Each has an important place in the research process

Identify key concepts

Develop search terms

Select databases

Introduce Boolean operators

Perform searches

Filter search results

Refine search strategy

With the map that you built in step one, you will begin to use research and evidence to justify the connections you made.

Identify Key Concepts

The first step is to identify the key concepts from your brainstorming map. Do this by selecting nouns important to the meaning of your topic or question and leave out words that don’t help the search such as adjectives and verbs.

Develop search terms

Once you have identified your key concepts, the next step is to create your search terms. Based on your key concepts brainstorm synonyms, related terms, and alternate forms of each the concepts. Also consider associations with other words and concepts.

Keywords are free text words and phrases, and they help to broaden your results. It is also referred to as natural language searching. Keywords will be searched in journal titles, author names, article titles, & article abstracts. They can also be tagged to search all text.

Subject headings or controlled vocabulary help to focus your search, often within a specific discipline or field. These standardized terms that have been assigned by trained experts.

Subject heading searching can be much more precise than keyword searching because you are sure to retrieve only your intended concept. Each database works differently so you need to adapt your search strategy for each database.

Select databases

Subject specific databases are the most effective way to search for peer reviewed articles. Databases can help you find a broad range of research, including background evidence and foreground information. Most library databases contain citations, abstracts, or full-text journal articles from thousands of journals, newspapers, historical documents, and other publications. Different databases have different algorithms, so you may have to adjust your search based on the database.

Think about what kind of sources you need and chose the right database to fit your needs.

Boolean operators

Boolean operators let you combine search terms in specific ways to broaden or narrow your search. Databases often show Boolean operators as buttons or drop-down menus that you can click to combine your search terms or results.

AND: Combines terms to narrow your search. This search will only retrieve articles containing both terms.

Example: pharmacists AND burnoutOR: Broadens your search by combining multiple search terms to fully cover a topic. This search will find articles containing each term separately, as well as both terms together.

Example: dementia OR Alzheimer’sNOT: Narrows the search and will exclude words from your search results. This search finds records containing the first term, but not the second.

Example: virus NOT influenza Perform search

With your search terms and Boolean operators, you can begin to create your search statement.

Here are some tips and tricks for performing your search: Put quotation marks around any phrases so that the phrase is searched together, rather

than as separate words.

Example: common cold vs. “common cold”

 Consider using wildcard and truncation symbols to broaden your search.

Example: wom?n finds women and woman

Example: therap* finds therapy, therapies, therapist, or therapists

 Use parentheses with multiple boolean operators to group the appropriate terms

together. Example: (cats OR dogs) AND (treatment OR therapy)

Filter search results

Using search filters can help you improve your search results. Common search filters limit search results by:

Publicationdate Resource type Full text availability Peer reviewed source Language

Refine your search

Searching is an iterative process. You’re not going to get all possible results on your first try. Closely examine your results and look for other angles or perspectives you could use to approach your research. Take notes on what strategies work so you can remember how you got to those results and avoid repeating searches.

If your search only produces a few results or the articles seem irrelevant to your research topic, consider these tips:

Check your spelling, research databases usually do not auto correct Broaden your search statement Add more search terms or brainstorm more related terms Meet with your subject librarian

If your search brought in too many results, consider these tips to focus your search: Check your Boolean operators Add search filters such as date range or publication type Reduce the number of search terms

Look for your key concepts in the article title or abstract

You are a medical professor in charge of creating college assignments and answers for medical college students. You design and conduct lectures, evaluate student performance and provide feedback through examinations and assignments. Answer each question separately. Include and Introduction. Provide an answer to this content Develop a literature map or a visual representation of the Public Health Informatics literature. Also include a powerpoint presentation explaining the literature map with the slidesConstructing a literature map helps you:develop an understanding of the key issues and research findings in the literatureorganize ideassee how different research studies relate to one anothergroup similar findingsidentify gaps in the literatureIt’s important to represent different views and aspects of the research. There is a danger in only including literature that supports your own beliefs or findings. The purpose of these assignments is not to test your accuracy of the literature, but to practice the skills for finding, selecting, and synthesizing research. Your brainstorming map and final literature map will not be exactly the same, and that’s okay. I want to see the progression of your understanding of key themes and ideas in the research.Idea mapping is a type of brainstorming. It can help you think of new topics or ideas and build upon what you know. A concept map is a visual representation of your topic or issue, and how it is linked to other themes and ideas. You can use concept maps to organize the information you already know or have, and then areas you want to further explore. Concept maps are also sometimes referred to as idea maps or spider diagrams.Concept MapConcept maps can take several shapes, and use different colors, lines, and images to organize ideas. Elements are arranged intuitively according to the importance of the concepts and organized into groups or branches. These maps can help you to identify hierarchies or expand to higher levels of thinking. They help you see connections between themes or ideas and provide an overview of key points. Concept maps can also be used to unpack ideas and maximize active learning. One advantage of concept maps is that they help you to see the big picture and help you chunk information together based on meaningful connections.Creating a MapConcept maps can be done with pen and paper or digitally. There are different software programs available for laptops and tablets like Miro Board, but it can also be done through Microsoft Word. But no matter what tool you use, all mind maps should begin with a central idea. Your central idea starts with the topic you are going explore in the context of public health informatics. If you want to color code your map, make your central topic a distinct color so it will always stand out on your page. From your central topic, begin to add branches. This is where the brainstorming begins. The main branches flow from your central topic as key themes, then you can expand on each of those themes with additional branches.Each branch you add will need to have its own key idea or concept linking it to the central topic. You want these to be brief to continue generating associations. This can also help you chunk ideas into concepts and themes that you can color code. Color coding links the visual and logical concepts in a mind map and generates mental shortcuts. It can also allow you identify connections you may not have immediately thought of. Adding color also makes it more appealing and engaging for yourself and any audience you share it with. Images can be impactful in creating mental shortcuts and associations, as well as convey information more effectively than words or phrases. The mind processes images instantly and act as visual stimuli to recall information. Consider using icons such as those from The Noun Project  add visual signifiers to your mind map.Using the map that you built in step one, you will begin to use research and evidence to justify the connections you made. Look at the ideas and connections that you made in the brainstorming map and find literature that supports your connection. You will build a search strategy for your different concepts using keywords, subject headings, and Boolean operators. Once you have your search results you will evaluate your sources, and refine your search as needed. Part of this assignment will be to practice these research skills and keep track of your search strategies.If you can’t find anything to support it, that’s okay. There will be a chance to update your map and reflect on the process later on.Building a Search StrategyThere are several steps involved in building a search strategy. Each has an important place in the research process. Identify key concepts: The first step is to identify the key concepts from your brainstorming map. Do this by selecting nouns important to the meaning of your topic or question and leave out words that don’t help the search such as adjectives and verbsDevelop search terms: Once you have identified your key concepts, the next step is to create your search terms. Based on your key concepts brainstorm synonyms, related terms, and alternate forms of each the concepts. Also consider associations with other words and concepts.Select databases: Subject specific databases are the most effective way to search for peer reviewed articles. Databases can help you find a broad range of research, including background evidence and foreground information. MostIntroduce Boolean operators: Boolean operators let you combine search terms in specific ways to broaden or narrow your search.Perform searches: With your search terms and Boolean operators, you can begin to create your search statement.Filter search results: Using search filters can help you improve your search results.Refine search strategy: Searching is an iterative process. You’re not going to get all possible results on your first try.Creating a search strategy is only half the battle. Once you find an article you need to consider the type of source and evaluate it against your information needs. To do this, scan the abstract and body of the article while asking yourself some of the key questions below in the DRAMA framework. If the article is relevant to your research process, then read it to pull out the information you need to support your argument. You can then use citation tracing strategies to find related information.Types of sourcesInformation needs are why you need sources. And it’s important that you find the right sources to fit your different information needs.Information needs include:To learn more background information.To answer your research question(s).To convince your audience that your answer is correct or, at least, the most reasonable answer.To describe the situation surrounding your research question for your audience and explain why it’s important.To report what others have said about your question, including any different answers to your research question.Evaluating SourcesSource evaluation is the process of critically appraising information in relation to a given purpose to determine if it’s appropriate for the intended useCitation tracingScholarship is a conversation. Citations form the basis of the scholarly communication and help to carry the conversation forward.  SearchingBuilding a Search StrategyUsing the map that you built in step one, you will begin to use research and evidence to justify the connections you made. Look at the ideas and connections that you made in the brainstorming map and find literature that supports your connection. You will build a search strategy for your different concepts using keywords, subject headings, and Boolean operators. Once you have your search results you will evaluate your sources, and refine your search as needed. Part of this assignment will be to practice these research skills and keep track of your search strategies.If you can’t find anything to support it, that’s okay. There will be a chance to update your map and reflect on the process later.Building a Search StrategyThere are several steps involved in building a search strategy. Each has an important place in the research processIdentify key conceptsDevelop search termsSelect databasesIntroduce Boolean operatorsPerform searchesFilter search resultsRefine search strategyWith the map that you built in step one, you will begin to use research and evidence to justify the connections you made.Identify Key ConceptsThe first step is to identify the key concepts from your brainstorming map. Do this by selecting nouns important to the meaning of your topic or question and leave out words that don’t help the search such as adjectives and verbs.Develop search termsOnce you have identified your key concepts, the next step is to create your search terms. Based on your key concepts…

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